" YOU'RE TO GO TO THURMAN AND LIVE WITH YOUR GRANDMA AND GRANDPA INGRAHAM. YOU'LL BE PICKED UP TOMORROW MORNING, EARLY," MA SAID, SCARCELY ABLE TO CONTROL HER VOICE..."

His mother's words were to thrust young Hollis Ingraham into a strange and threatening new world. What mystery surrounding his father's death had made his grandparents so cold and distant?

Hollis has but one dream--to get money so he can be reunited with his mother. This quest for Adirondack gold threatens his very life and leads him to an unexpected treasure.

Readers come to understand the responsibility that children assumed in daily life and the way that the whims of changeable mountain weather affected people in rural regions. They see a strong work ethic, the value of a community pulling together, the unfairness of bigotry.

Elementary and middle school teachers wishing to use Adirondack Gold in language arts and social studies programs should be sure to visit our Adirondack Gold Teacher's Guide page to learn about supplemental materials available.

John Rowen, reviewer at the Sunday Gazette (Schenectady, NY) says:

Adirondack Gold offers enjoyable reading, the literary equivalent of the first maple syrup of spring or the first warm breeze after sub-zero weather…. She (Granger) has the storyteller's knack of pulling the reader into the story. She develops strong characters and captures the essence of Adirondack places….Although Adirondack Gold was written for young adults, it transcends its genre. Strong writing and research makes it highly recommended for readers of any age who are interested in the Adirondacks, 19th century New York history or rural life.

March 21, 2004

 

 

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